Chiropractor - Charlotte
3121 Springbank Lane
Charlotte, North Carolina 28226
704-541-5353




The more you understand your body and how it functions, the better equipped you'll be at taking care of yourself to achieve optimal health. Our team of chiropractic professionals empower patients to take charge of your own health and future, educating you about your condition to decrease your need for future care. We've included the Patient Education section on our website to provide you with valuable, practical wellness information which you can incorporate into your lifestyle to improve the quality of your life. We hope you will turn to these pages whenever you have a question about health related issues and urge you to contact our practice at any time to make an appointment with one of our chiropractors.

 

Dr. Matt Robertson's Blog

 

Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most common reasons people seek medical attention and is the symptom that prompts most patients to seek chiropractic care. The majority of backache sufferers complain of pain in the lower back; the second most common site of discomfort is the base of the neck.

Virtually all human beings are subject to back problems. The fact that humans walk upright on two legs puts great pressure on the spine and muscles that support it. Over time, back pain is all but inevitable. Normal wear and tear, accidents, disease, and such bad "back habits" as unnecessary strain from overexertion at play or work (especially lifting, pushing, pulling, and reaching for things improperly), and poor standing and sitting posture results in both immediate and long-term back problems.

While back pain can be caused by a wide range of problems, it is often indicative of spinal subluxation. Spinal subluxations often have symptoms localized in some part of the back or may radiate down to the buttocks, thighs, and legs. Dr. Matt successfully treats subluxation through soothing and pain reducing spinal adjustments. His approach is similar to the clinical practice guidelines of the U. S. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research in that he tries to keep patients engaging in their normal activities rather than resting immobile in bed, which can actually cause further debilitation.
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Headaches

Because headaches are so common, many people feel that they are a normal part of life, but headaches are a sign that something is wrong. Extremely common causes of headaches are subluxated vertebrae in the upper neck, which puts direct pressure on the brain stem and spinal nerves controlling the head and neck. When these delicate nerves and surrounding vessels and tissues are irritated or stretched they can produce headaches. Over the counter pain relievers can ease the pain, but the subluxated vertebrae causing the headache are still there. Only a chiropractor can remove these misalignments in your spine.
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Accident, Injuries

Auto accidents, falls and other traumas big or small can create subluxated vertebrae, damage to spinal nerves and tissues and disturb normal motion in the spine. Long-term damage from vertebral subluxations can be avoided with chiropractic care.
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Scoliosis

In most cases, the cause of scoliosis is unknown. Although it is not caused by poor posture as once thought. Most people with scoliosis lead a normal life, and many don't even know they have scoliosis. In rare, severe cases, breathing and heart problems can accompany scoliosis. A chiropractor can assure that the body is free of subluxations so that the nervous system is functioning properly.

One research report of 100 chiropractic patients with scoliosis revealed improvement in 84%. 6.8% had total correction, 35.8% had significant improvement, 41.2% had a small correction, and only 16.4% showed no improvement or worsening.
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Ear Infections

Otitis Media or middle ear infections have become quite common for children nowadays. They often come on quite suddenly and cause severe pain for a child. One cause could be a reaction to childhood vaccinations which disrupt the developing child's natural immune systems with often severe side effects including asthma, hyperactivity and attention disorder as well as ear infection. Chiropractic care is one of the best treatments for a child with an ear infection. Normal nerve supply to the ear can be restored by aligning the spine back into its normal position. Keeping your child's spine free from interference enhances its natural defenses, and avoids the need for dangerous drugs.
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Learning Disorders

Although chiropractic is not a specific treatment for learning disorders, chiropractic care has provided improvements to many children suffering from learning disabilities. Both parents and teachers can attest to the effectiveness of chiropractic care for children with learning disorders, hyperactivity, behavioral problems and inability to concentrate.
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Bed-wetting

For years many parents have brought their children in for chiropractic care to keep them healthy and as a side effect of care, their child's bed-wetting problem stopped or was improved. Chiropractors often see wonderful improvements or total correction of bed-wetting problems after a few adjustments, often after just one adjustment. Here is a clip from "Dear Abby" concerning a chiropractic success story with bed-wetting,

"Dear Abby:
I took my fifteen-year-old twin sons (both daily bed-wetters) to a chiropractor, and within a month, both boys were completely cured. Regular medical doctors could not help them. As this chiropractor explained to me, there is a certain part of the spinal column that regulates the bladder... all I can say is it worked." (Signed) True believer.

Dear Believer:
I believe you. I have several hundred letters bearing the same message concerning chiropractors. To clarify the above message, the chiropractic adjustments relieves nerve pressure on the spinal nerves that go to the bladder muscles or the bladder organ itself, thus allowing it to function properly.
(San Francisco Chronicles, March 5, 1992)
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Disc Problems

Intervertebrae discs are the thick gel like shock absorbers that lie between the bones of your spinal column. These discs help allow the spine to curve (a spine with the proper curves in it is 10 times stronger than a straight line) The discs are mostly water, and so you are up to 1/2 inch shorter at the end of the day and 1/2 inch taller in the mornings after the discs have realigned in your sleep.

I'm sure you have heard of the term "slipped disc". Actually a disc cannot slip because it is strongly banded to the bones above it and below it, but it can weaken and the jelly center can start to bulge outwards. When this happens, the bulge can put direct pressure on the delicate spinal nerves or the spinal cord itself.
Chiropractic care is essential in keeping the spine in proper alignment to promote a healthy disc between the vertebrae. Chiropractors have excellent results with patients suffering from disc problems and usually can prevent them from having a risky surgery. Whether you've had a back surgery already and hoping to prevent another or hoping to never have to go under the knife, chiropractic adjustments are essential and the best thing you can do for your health.
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Colds and Flu

Everyone knows that there is no cure for the common cold right? Right. But, the condition of your body's immune system is what determines the duration of the sickness and the severity of symptoms associated with a cold.
Chiropractors do not treat the common cold. Chiropractors do raise your body's natural resistance to a cold virus by removing any interference in the nervous system. The better your nervous system is functioning, the better ability it has in fighting off colds. Patients under chiropractic care often go years without colds and when they get a cold their symptoms are not as severe.

Keeping your spine free from misalignments (subluxations) will help to keep your immune system functioning to the best of its ability.

There are hundreds of ways (some subtle and some readily apparent) that we can injure ourselves working or relaxing in and around the home. By not following basic safety precautions and just simple common sense, we put our health at risk doing even the simplest of tasks.

Following are some simple tips to follow.

  • Avoid cradling the phone between your neck and shoulder. This can lock up the spinal joints in the neck and upper back. Consider a speakerphone or wireless headset.
  • If you need to turn to carry what you've picked up, step in the direction of the turn to avoid twisting your body and straining your spine. Raise one foot slightly when standing doing ironing, or rest one foot on a small step stool or box.
  • Standing for long periods of time, during dishwashing, for example, can put a great deal of strain on your neck, back, knees, and feet. When standing at the sink, rest one foot on the inside cabinet below the sink and bend the knee on that leg. This will take some of the pressure off.
  • Use pillows or some other firm support when sitting in a chair or couch watching television. Don't use the arm of the chair or couch for a headrest. This strains your neck.
  • When lifting, don't bend from the waist. Squat down by bending both knees, keeping your back straight. This way, you are using your arms and shoulders—not your back—to do the lifting.
  • When vacuuming, use the "fencer's stance" by putting all of your weight on one foot while stepping back and forward with your other. Use the back foot as a pivot when you need to turn

Gardening

  • Make sure your body is properly conditioned when doing outside work. Warmed-up muscles will be less likely to tighten up or snap when under the strains of bending, pulling, pushing, reaching, or stooping. You can warm up by taking a brisk walk or doing simple stretching exercises, such as knee-to-chest pulls, trunk rotations, and side bends with hands above your head and fingers locked.
  • Always carry objects close to your body, near your center of gravity. This minimizes the strain to your lower back and neck.
  • Change positions if you're involved in doing a task such as kneeling or sitting. This will improve your circulation and mobility. Don't overdo it. Alternate between several tasks to keep yourself alert, and take regular rest breaks.
  • Let your arms, legs and thighs (not your back) do the work when lifting heavy items, such as bags of mulch or dirt. Bend and straighten at the knees instead of your back and hips. Never pick up a load that causes you to grunt – this is your body telling you that you're overdoing it.
  • The longer the handle on your garden tools, the greater leverage you have and the less force and twisting motions you need to perform routine tasks. Imagine having to rake leaves with a six-inch handle. The longer the handle, the less work and strain. This is especially true for chores involving raking, digging, pushing, and mowing. When doing ground-level chores, such as weeding or planting, do not repeatedly bend over. Rather, get close to the ground by either kneeling or sitting (foam pads or small benches are made especially for these kinds of chores). When doing prolonged tasks, such as raking, hoeing, or digging, frequently switch hands. This helps to maximize the amount of energy reserves you use in muscles on both sides of your body.
  • Repetitive motion on one side of your body can lead to serious problems, such as muscle spasms in the neck, shoulder, and lower back. When you stand up after crouching or kneeling for a long period of time, do so slowly and gently to avoid muscle pulls or even joint dislocations. Straighten your legs at the knees, and do not lift your torso at the waist.

Mowing

  • If you have asthma or allergies, wear a mask
  • Stand as straight as possible, and keep your head up as you rake or mow.
  • Try to mow during the early morning and early evening hours, when the sun is not so hot.
  • Drink plenty of liquids to keep your muscles hydrated.
  • Protect yourself by wearing a hat, shoes, earplugs, and protective glasses.
  • Use as much as your body weight as possible to move your mower (unless it is self-propelled). This will minimize excessive strain to your arms and back.
  • When picking up piles of leaves or grass from the grass catcher, bend at your knees, not at your waist.
  • When raking leaves, use a "scissors" stance. This entails keeping your right foot forward and left foot back for a few minutes. Occasionally switch by putting your left foot forward and right foot back. Always bend at your knees, not the waist, as you pick up leaves. Make piles small to minimize the possibility of straining your back.